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Dear readers, it’s common knowledge how devastating cancer is to patients and their families.

Why??? Resonates in our minds when a loved one is diagnosed with this deadly disease in its many  ways and forms.  We come up with a million possible reasons trying to come to terms with the whys.

But, we are overlooking the practices  modern day farmers are employing when they harvest their crop.  Which is later sold to stores who distribute them and they end up on our tables.  Produce that becomes our breakfast, lunch or dinner along the way.

This is why I’m writing a series of posts related to farming practices and policies and how they are affecting the average consumer.

tractor.jpg

via morguefile

We need to go one step further when we are buying the products we consume in our homes.  The other day I opened a bag of spinach I usually buy at the supermarket and looked the company up, to my surprise they were second generation farmers from California who are practicing ecological friendly farming.

Do we need to stop and kind of check out who we’re buying from? I would say “DEFINITELY”.

For example, some years ago when in Puerto Rico the plantain harvest was scarce, they got expensive.  You can get a plantain from twenty-five cents to a dollar.  Some called them “oro verde” which means green gold.  Farmers who were able to harvest them when no other had them to distribute made their fair amount of money.  The land was the vehicle for the business transaction.

The land we live and eat out of is part of this marvelous creation.  Land really belongs to no one.  I have a deed that says that my house in anchored on three acres of land that our under my husband’s name, but nonetheless it’s not really ours.  Can we take it when we finally leave this thing we call life.  I don’t think so! It’s ours to use and share.  It is alive and can nurture our bodies and souls.  Farmers need to step back and see the land they have the privilege of harvesting as a living thing.

The question is, would you poison a person or an animal?

Then why are we poisoning our lands with pesticides?

Pesticides that end up in the food we are putting on our tables.

Pesticides that are linked with cancer in every possible way.  Even though healthy lifestyles are being adopted constantly, the very source of cancer is being overlooked.

We need to seek answers even if with our interrogatives we may cause discomfort to those who are violating the lands that cover this beautiful blue globe.

We would have to ask ourselves, why isn’t the government doing something about this, other than offer workshops on how to handle pesticides to local farmers.  Probably because farmer associations and lobbyists are the very ones that are influencing policy makers who are elected to office every four years.  They hand out their favors through hefty contributions equally to all, they really don’t care to much who or what they respond to because at the end of the day it’s all about politics.

Which brings us back to rethinking where we are getting our food from.  Who are these farmers and distributors that sell the produce.  Here in Puerto Rico green plantains are a staple item, but truth to be told  farmers are heavy on pesticides and those same chemicals end up in our tables.  Produce we feed our families and ourselves with.

Remember, be kind to yourself and to others and practice awareness of the capital humanity has  which is nature with all its resources.  Let us make good use of it.

See you around the corner.

 

References:

Santiago, Xiomara B. Dr.; Rivera, Desiree; Pabon, Agnes; and Garcia, Arnaldo (2016) “
An Examination of the Use of Pesticides in Puerto Rican Agriculture,”RURALS: Review of Undergraduate Research in Agriculture and Life Sciences: Volume 10: Iss. 1; Article 1.